Archives for posts with tag: Chalk

symposium programme
Jodie Dalgleish: photo Victoria Rick
Last year the writer and curator Jodie Dalgleish wrote an essay in response to the symposium: chalk: time ,sense and landscape A ‘summary, interpretation and inquiry’ of the sounds, images, and themes of the day, the essay was published in EyeContact and a transcript of the full essay is available here: Time Sense Landscape Essay: Jodie Dalgleish

Jodie has subsequently been working on a ‘sonic continuation of my recall and consideration of the one-day Symposium’, weaving sounds, thoughts and voices into a series of audio essays or reveries. The first ‘mix’ is now available and includes sounds and voices from the short award winning documentary, Notes on Blindness, which introduced the day. The film, based on John M. Hull’s autobiography of sightloss Touching the Rock (1990), has subsequently been made into a feature length film (of the same name) released in cinemas across the UK on the 1st July. The spoken thoughts of Dalgleish mingle with fragments of the film’s soundtrack, Prof John Levack Drever’s keynote address reflecting on John M. Hull’s writing and Nick Thorpe’s archaeological dig through the neolithic monuments and rituals of the chalk landscape. The sonic landscape concludes in dripping fragments of my own talk and the performance of rain choir.
Time, sense and landscape mix 1, by Jodie Dalgleish is available here.

Audio transcripts of all the contributions to the symposium will be made available later this year. If you are interested in learning more about this or would like a programme from the symposium please contact me via this website.

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fossil dissolve: sebastiane hegarty
Remembering Chalk, a day of rain, hand dryers, neolithic landscapes, guttering and singing dunes, exhausted shelves and spectral houses, the last sightings of extinct songs, lavender sellers and the long quiet fall of light through Connemara.
The curator and writer Jodie Dalgleish reflects on the symposium, Chalk: time, sense and landscape in her article for the New Zealand on-line art review EyeContact: http://eyecontactsite.com/2015/11/sally-ann-mcintyre-at-winchester-symposium

Link to the full un-edited Essay by Jodie Dalgleish available here:
Time Sense Landscape Essay: Jodie Dalgleish

Sally Ann McIntyre
Sally Ann McIntyre: Victoria Rick
Symposium Chair: Marius Kwint
Marius Kwint: Victoria Rick
Symposium Keynote Speaker: John Levack Drever
John Levack Drever: Victoria Rick
Archaeologist: Nick Thorpe
Nick Thorpe: Victoria Rick
Sound Artist and Symposium Curator: Sebastiane Hegarty
Sebastiane Hegarty: Victoria Rick
Geologist: Michael Welland
Michael Welland: Victoria Rick
Architectural Historian: Karen Fielder
Karen Fielde: Victoria Rick
Composer: Paul Whitty
Paul Whitty: Victoria Rick
Sound Archivist & Curator of London Sound Survey: Ian Rawes
Ian Rawes: Victoria Rick
Sally Ann McIntyre and Marius Kwint
Sally and Marius: Victoria Rick
Film Artist: Guy Sherwin
Guy Sherwin: Victoria Rick
Film: Connemara by Guy Sherwin
Guy Sherwin Connemara 2: Victoria Rick

Symposium Photography: Victoria Rick

drumsThe Folkton drums: Nick Thorpe
Dorset Cursus plot by Martin Green2
As part of tomorrow’s  symposium, the archaeologist and author, Nick Thorpe will discuss the prehistoric use of chalk, not only as a place to leave a mark or a rock to carve into figurines,  but also as the material used to create the first British monuments; a form of neolithic land art, existing thousands of years before Smithson. He writes: ‘hundreds of metres across, taking thousands of hours to create.  The visual impact of these chalk monuments may have been just as shocking as modern art, permanently scarring the land.’  As ‘performance spaces’ these sites not only manipulated the visual landscape, but also how it was used and how it sounded.

See programme for full details of this talk and the other presentations at the symposium: timesenselandscape.com/programme

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