Archives for posts with tag: Prof Paul Whitty

fossil dissolve: sebastiane hegarty
Remembering Chalk, a day of rain, hand dryers, neolithic landscapes, guttering and singing dunes, exhausted shelves and spectral houses, the last sightings of extinct songs, lavender sellers and the long quiet fall of light through Connemara.
The curator and writer Jodie Dalgleish reflects on the symposium, Chalk: time, sense and landscape in her article for the New Zealand on-line art review EyeContact: http://eyecontactsite.com/2015/11/sally-ann-mcintyre-at-winchester-symposium

Link to the full un-edited Essay by Jodie Dalgleish available here:
Time Sense Landscape Essay: Jodie Dalgleish

Sally Ann McIntyre
Sally Ann McIntyre: Victoria Rick
Symposium Chair: Marius Kwint
Marius Kwint: Victoria Rick
Symposium Keynote Speaker: John Levack Drever
John Levack Drever: Victoria Rick
Archaeologist: Nick Thorpe
Nick Thorpe: Victoria Rick
Sound Artist and Symposium Curator: Sebastiane Hegarty
Sebastiane Hegarty: Victoria Rick
Geologist: Michael Welland
Michael Welland: Victoria Rick
Architectural Historian: Karen Fielder
Karen Fielde: Victoria Rick
Composer: Paul Whitty
Paul Whitty: Victoria Rick
Sound Archivist & Curator of London Sound Survey: Ian Rawes
Ian Rawes: Victoria Rick
Sally Ann McIntyre and Marius Kwint
Sally and Marius: Victoria Rick
Film Artist: Guy Sherwin
Guy Sherwin: Victoria Rick
Film: Connemara by Guy Sherwin
Guy Sherwin Connemara 2: Victoria Rick

Symposium Photography: Victoria Rick

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Poster - chalk: time, sense and landscape
It is with deep sadness that we have learned of the death of keynote speaker, John M. Hull.

John was Emeritus Professor of Religious Education at the University of Birmingham and Honorary Professor of Practical Theology at the Queen’s Foundation for Ecumenical Theological Education. Widely published on the subjects of religion and blindness, in 2012 he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the RNIB. Born in 1935, John developed cataracts in his youth and lost his sight completely 1983. In the book Touching the Rock, John describes and reflects upon his journey into blindness, a journey that not only offers an insight into a sight less world, but also helps to extend our understanding of how the senses involve us in the world around us. In particular, John’s experience of sound and listening reveals sensual landscapes, which transform our physical and emotional presence in the world. The following is an extract from a lecture given by John in 2001 and published in Soundscape: The Journal of Acoustic Ecology:

‘I learnt to listen to the sound of the rain. I can remember times when, in my study at home, I would become conscious that there was a storm going on. I would forget about my disorientated and vacated interior and would become aware of the wind, thundering upon the corner of the house, whistling through the eaves. And then I would become aware of the rain, splattering on the windowpane. I would stand up. I would press my nose hard against the window. And gradually it was as if the glass disappeared, because now my consciousness extended out from my nose pressed upon a panel of glass until it became un-conscious […] The rain had turned the light on […] And as I listened to [it fall], I realised I was no longer listening, because the rain was not falling into my ears, it was falling into my heart.’

We would like to dedicate this symposium to the memory of John and offer our sincere condolences to John’s wife Marilyn, their children and grandchildren.

The symposium will begin with a showing of the award winning documentary Notes On Blindness, made by Peter Middleton and James Spinney and based on the audio cassette diaries, which john used to ‘write’ Touching The Rock.

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