Archives for posts with tag: Connemara

fossil dissolve: sebastiane hegarty
Remembering Chalk, a day of rain, hand dryers, neolithic landscapes, guttering and singing dunes, exhausted shelves and spectral houses, the last sightings of extinct songs, lavender sellers and the long quiet fall of light through Connemara.
The curator and writer Jodie Dalgleish reflects on the symposium, Chalk: time, sense and landscape in her article for the New Zealand on-line art review EyeContact: http://eyecontactsite.com/2015/11/sally-ann-mcintyre-at-winchester-symposium

Link to the full un-edited Essay by Jodie Dalgleish available here:
Time Sense Landscape Essay: Jodie Dalgleish

Sally Ann McIntyre
Sally Ann McIntyre: Victoria Rick
Symposium Chair: Marius Kwint
Marius Kwint: Victoria Rick
Symposium Keynote Speaker: John Levack Drever
John Levack Drever: Victoria Rick
Archaeologist: Nick Thorpe
Nick Thorpe: Victoria Rick
Sound Artist and Symposium Curator: Sebastiane Hegarty
Sebastiane Hegarty: Victoria Rick
Geologist: Michael Welland
Michael Welland: Victoria Rick
Architectural Historian: Karen Fielder
Karen Fielde: Victoria Rick
Composer: Paul Whitty
Paul Whitty: Victoria Rick
Sound Archivist & Curator of London Sound Survey: Ian Rawes
Ian Rawes: Victoria Rick
Sally Ann McIntyre and Marius Kwint
Sally and Marius: Victoria Rick
Film Artist: Guy Sherwin
Guy Sherwin: Victoria Rick
Film: Connemara by Guy Sherwin
Guy Sherwin Connemara 2: Victoria Rick

Symposium Photography: Victoria Rick

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Guy Sherwin: Hand shutter
Guy Sherwin: Connemara drawing
We are delighted to announce that, as part of chalk: time, sense and landscape, the avant-garde film artist, Guy Sherwin will be showing Connemara, a film unseen for over three decades.
Made on a trip to Ireland in 1980, the 16mm film offers a long, slow meditation on time and landscape. Static shots linger and stare into the landscape and upon the traces of human activity, whilst in the quiet collision of imagery and ambient sounds, place waits, returns and repeats.
Only screened a few times in the 1980’s, in 2011 EYE Institute Amsterdam ‘took the film into their archive and restored it with great care’.
The absence of the film extends to its documentation; no extracts are available and only one film still, a low resolution, pixelated haystack.
Sherwin, who originally studied painting at Chelsea in the 1970’s, has supplied one of his own drawings as documentation.
With this new print, light returns to Connemara, as Sherwin projects and perhaps sees his film for the first time in thirty-five years.

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